5 May 15

The Raw & Very Real Reality About Breast Cancer.

The truth is until something hits home and you actually imagine it, you cannot understand what it would be like… Sometimes we don’t actually care (without deliberate intention) because it’s what happens to other people. Not us… others.

Numbers are just numbers until we live through it.

When I say 1 in 8, you know, we all know but what does it really mean until we live it…

It’s not enough to care that it’s as common as 1 in 8 women, because it comes down to one, your sister, your friend, your Mum, your Aunty, your niece, your cousin or maybe you.

We see information, awareness and brands circling around Breast Cancer like we live on a fluffy cloud. I get it, I really do because the truth is that sometimes people don’t like the raw, in your face reality that cancer brings.

I respect that sometimes it’s hard to embrace and see when we live these crazy busy lives, but it’s more then breast cancer, it’s more then cancer… it’s about courage, bravery and having the ability to fight and see the light in times when you need it most.

It’s the thing in your life that makes you feel like an outsider, but in reality it’s the very thing that brings us together and unites us….

Because at some point in time we will be forced to care. 

Give yourself time today to care, to feel and embrace courage, life and strength 

No fluff, no circling around any issues, no fluffy clouds. But strength. 

The SCAR Project is by photographer David Jay, he was inspired to act when a dear friend was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 32. Like the subjects themselves, Jay's stark, bold portraits challenge traditional perceptions of the disease and capture the raw beauty, strength and character of so many extraordinary young women. Each portrait represents a singular, stripped-down vision of the life-changing journey that unites them all.

Just like his photography I wanted to get a raw and open feel for David Jay and what he has to say about breast cancer and The SCAR Project.

 

You have captured Breast Cancer like it has never been seen before, why was that important to you?

I struggled shooting The SCAR Project. I was torn. I wanted the pictures to be raw, honest, sincere. Yet I knew why the subjects had come—they wanted something beautiful. They had already suffered greatly and although I desperately wanted to serve them, I knew in my heart that compromising the visual integrity of The SCAR Project for the sake of easily digested beauty would serve no one.

There is an inherent beauty in humanity. A beauty that transcends the glossy, mass-produced images force-fed by popular media. We recognize it instantly: The human condition. Hope, despair, love, loss, courage, fear. Such fragile beauty. I moved closer.

You say “Breast Cancer Is Not A Pink Ribbon” what do you mean by that?

I want to be clear, ultimately The SCAR Project is not about breast cancer. It is about many things.  It's very easy to look at the images and see breast cancer, but saying that would be like looking at the ocean and only seeing water. It's certainly not about the scars. I'm not interested in them; the scars are just markers that something else has happened.

 

When you say “The SCAR Project is not about breast cancer, but the human condition itself; the images transcend the disease, illuminating the scars that unite us all” What is the deeper message?

The images can be uncomfortable for the viewer. It forces us to confront our fears and inhibitions about life, death, sexuality, sickness, relationships, etc. I once read it described as “unflinching.” Reality is not always pretty. This is reality. Let’s address it. The SCAR Project presents an opportunity to open a dialogue about issues we are not necessarily comfortable with.

 

If people want to help or contribute to The SCAR Project how can they do that?

You can go to http://www.thescarproject.org/be-involved/

 

The SCAR Project 

Images © David Jay Photography

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The SCAR Project

David Jay

 

Breast cancer

 

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breast cancer

 

The SCAR Project

 

Writing this made me think… We all have scars, some visible, some not, irregardless we all have them and it is through this adversity that we become one. 

 

A BIG thank you to David Jay Photography for releasing these images so I can share them with you and Toni from Trulife for the inspiration to write the post after our chat xxx 

 

Are you due for a Mammogram?

 

 

 

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  • I’m proud of my scars – those across my chest from breast cancer and those on my spirit from domestic violence – all of which, years later, are now healing: they show that I’m stronger than what tried to kill me.

    • Love that Kathy and you know something, when I was being abused by my then partner I also was going through treatment for cervical cancer…. No coincidence I don’t think.

      Love and admire your thought process and strength. xxx

      • And I love and admire YOUR thought process and strength!
        Would love to have the opportunity to chat with you to see how we might be able to work together – I am the Founder and President of impact [www.impactforwomen.org.au; http://www.facebook.com/ImpactForWomen%5D and, if you still have a minute or three left in your busy week, I’d love to invite you to be our Patron.

        • Let’s chat Kathy! Email me and we’ll arrange a time x

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